Category Archives: Building

Happy Wanderer

In this song, the last line of the previous verse is added at the end of the chorus. It is in italics below. The first time the chorus is sung, it would be “knapsack on my back,” but the second time the line would be “come join my happy song.”

I love to go a-wandering,
Along the mountain track,
And as I go, I love to sing,
My knapsack on my back.

Chorus:
Val-der-ri, val-der-ra
Val-der-ri, val-der-ra ha ha ha ha ha
Val-der-ri, val-der-ra
My knapsack on my back.*

I love to wander by the stream,
That dances in the sun,
So joyously it calls to me,
Come join my happy song.

Chorus

I wave my hat to all I meet,
And they wave back at me,
And blackbirds call so loud and clear,
From every greenwood tree.

Chorus

Oh, may I go a-wandering,
Until the day I die,
And may I always laugh and sing,
Beneath God’s clear blue sky.

Chorus

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Golden Prairie Song

 Many years ago they say, ‘Long came the Hudson’s Bay,
Built their little forts along the rivers!
Those forts grew and grew,
And I’m telling you,
They’re still growing bigger and bigger.

Chorus:
Golden Prairie Land,
Grandest mountain land,
Sing for all you’re worth.
Sing ‘cause you’re proud of it,
Right out loud with it,
Finest country on earth.
Bright blue skies above,
Home towns we dearly love.
Sing with might and main.
Golden Prairie Land,
Grandest mountain land.
Sing it again and again!

Honor to the pioneers,
Heroes of bygone years,
Built their little shacks along the rivers!
They prepared the way,
So we find today,
We’re still growing bigger and bigger.

Chorus

Come along a thousand fold,
Oil wells with liquid gold,
Gas and coal miners ‘long the rivers!
Pay us a friendly call,
Welcome one and all,
And help us grow bigger and bigger.

Chorus

Woodsmoke Song

With the scent of woodsmoke drifting on the air,
And the glow of firelight we always love to share,
Visions of camp-fires all return,
And as the logs flame up and burn,
We dream of bygone campfires and long for those to come.

Tongues of yellow fire flickering up on high,
Reaching twisting fingers up to a starlit sky,
Voices recall songs old and new,
Songs once dear to our fathers too,
Who dreamed of bygone campfires and longed for those to come.

Gently dying embers cast a rosy glow,
Voices slowly sinking to tones so soft and low,
Slowly upon the still night air,
Fall faithful voices hushed in prayer,
That dream of bygone campfires and long for those to come.

Junior Birdsman

 Up in the air junior birdman,
Up in the air upside down,
Up in the air junior birdman,
Keep your noses off the ground.

When you hear the grand announcement,
that your wings are made of tin,
Then you know that Junior Birdman,
has turned his box tops in.

For it takes:
5 box tops,
4 bottle bottoms,
3 coupons,
2 wrappers,
and one thin dime!

En Roulant Ma Boule

 Please excuse my abysmal French. I tried my best! French isn’t my first language.

Chorus:
En roulant ma boule roulant,
En roulant ma boule,
En roulant ma boule roulant,
En roulant ma boule.

Derrière chez nous y-a-t’un étang,
En roulant ma boule.
Trois beaux canards s’en vont baignant,
Rouli-roulant, ma boule roulant.

Chorus

Le fils du roi s’en va chassant,
En roulant ma boule.
Avec son grand fusil d’argent,
Rouli-roulant, ma boule roulant.

Chorus

Visa le noir, tua le blanc,
En roulant ma boule.
O, fils du roi tu es méchant,
Rouli-roulant, ma boule roulant.

Chorus

Et toutes ses plumes s’en vont au vent,
En roulant ma boule.
Trois dames s’en vont les ramassant,
Rouli-roulant, ma boule roulant.

Chorus

C’est pour en faire un lit de camp,
En roulant ma boule.
Pour y coucher tous les passants,
Rouli-roulant, ma boule roulant.

Chorus

Frère Jacques

 Please forgive my abysmal French. I tried my best! French isn’t my first language.

Frère Jacques
Frère Jacques
Dormez-vous?
Dormez-vous?
Sonnez les matines
Sonnez les matines
Ding, ding, dong
Ding, ding, dong

Au Claire De La Lune

 Please forgive my abysmal French. I tried my best! French isn’t my first language.

“Au clair de la lune,
Mon ami Pierrot,
Prête-moi ta plume
Pour écrire un mot.
Ma chandelle est morte,
Je n’ai plus de feu.
Ouvre-moi ta porte
Pour l’amour de Dieu.”

Au clair de la lune,
Pierrot répondit :
“Je n’ai pas de plume,
Je suis dans mon lit.
Va chez la voisine,
Je crois qu’elle y est,
Car dans sa cuisine
On bat le briquet.”

Au clair de la lune,
L’aimable Lubin;
Frappe chez la brune,
Elle répond soudain :
–Qui frappe de la sorte?
Il dit à son tour :
–Ouvrez votre porte,
Pour le Dieu d’Amour.

Au clair de la lune,
On n’y voit qu’un peu.
On chercha la plume,
On chercha du feu.
En cherchant d’la sorte,
Je n’sais c’qu’on trouva;
Mais je sais qu’la porte
Sur eux se ferma.

Ballad of the Bluenose

Well now gather ’round and I’ll tell you true,
‘Bout the ghost of a legend and the waters she’s been through,
Out of Lunenburg she was born to fame,
With her crew unsung, never to complain,
She was lightning on the wind the Bluenose was her name.

Barely one year old when she had her way,
Outsailed the finest ships in Nova Scotia of the day,
And the word had spread and by fall she’d be,
With her mainsail high, through the wind and waves,
Sailing home from Gloucester hailed the fastest of the sea.

Chorus:
So fare thee well, now be on your way,
Fare thee well with the light of day,
Fare thee well through the mist and sea,
Sail your way home to me.

More than ninety-nine tons she displaced with ease,
And she proved the greatest miracle to ever catch a breeze,
But still every year she would earn her keep,
Where the Grand Banks heave and the storms contrive,
She would fill her hold with bounty of the deep.

Well the decades glide and her prowess grew,
And long the list of schooners who could never follow through,
But as time drew on and with bills to pay,
Sad misfortune led to the southern sea,
And now her papers read, “West Indies Trading Company.”

Chorus

“Twas a cruel day back in forty-six,
Just off the coast of Haiti was the devil playing tricks,
On an unmarked reef underneath the blue,
There she came to rest, lying brave and true,
A thousand miles or more from where her dreams were cast anew.

Then from Lunenburg down to Gloucester town,
And all across the ocean to her northern fishing ground,
For that one long day, yea the wind stood still,
As the rigging creaked, you could feel her pain,
Like a ghostly voice was echoing that Bluenose was her name.

Chorus

The Land of New Brunswick

 If you want peace of mind, leave your worries far behind.
Won’t you come back with me to that land down by the sea?
Where the tall timbers, in the valleys green below,
Reaching up to the hills of New Brunswick.

With the sweet breath of springtime, the smell of new mown hay,
Leaves that turn to red and gold and snow on Christmas Day.
There is kindness to spare, you’ll be welcome to a share,
Of the love and the Land of New Brunswick.

Hole In My Bucket

 This song is sung as a call and response between Henry and Liza. It follows the same format every time it is sung, but each time, part of the verse is replaced with something new. The full version is written out here.

Liza: Henry! Fetch me some water!

Henry: There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,
There’s a hole in my bucket dear Liza, a hole.

Liza: Well, fix it dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Well, fix it dear Henry, dear Henry, fix it.

Henry: With what shall I fix it, dear Liza, dear Liza,
With what shall I fix it dear Liza, with what?

Liza: With a straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
With a straw dear Henry, dear Henry, with a straw.

Henry: The straw is too long, dear Liza, dear Liza,
The straw is too long dear Liza, too long.

Liza: Well, cut it dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Well, cut it dear Henry, dear Henry, cut it.

Henry: With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, dear Liza,
With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, with what?

Liza: With an axe dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
With an axe dear Henry, dear Henry, an axe.

Henry: The axe is too dull, dear Liza, dear Liza,
The axe is too dull dear Liza, too dull.

Liza: Well, sharpen it dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Well, sharpen it dear Henry, dear Henry, sharpen it.

Henry: With what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, dear Liza,
With what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, with what?

Liza: With a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
with a stone dear Henry, dear Henry, a stone.

Henry: The stone is too dry, dear Liza, dear Liza,
The stone is too dry dear Liza, too dry.

Liza: Well, wet it dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
Well, wet it dear Henry, dear Henry, wet it.

Henry: With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, dear Liza,
With what shall I wet it dear Liza, with what?

Liza: With water dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
With water dear Henry, dear Henry, with water.

Henry: In what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, dear Liza,
In what shall I fetch it dear Liza, in what?

Liza: In a bucket dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,
In a bucket dear Henry, dear Henry, a bucket.

Henry: There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,
There’s a hole in my bucket dear Liza, a hole.

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